The Montana Conservationist, March 20

Greetings, TMC readers! It’s the first day of spring (I knew it would come eventually!), my tulips are coming up, and it’s TMC day. Does life get any better? Here’s what’s in store for you this week:

  • Judith Basin CD recently welcomed their first female supervisor, part of a growing trend of women in agriculture leadership roles.
  • Producers in the Cut Bank area are excited about a new food-grade pulse crop processing facility that will be able to process chickpeas, peas, and lentils, creating more opportunities & markets for the popular crops
  • And while we’re on pulses, a recent study shows that different cover crops release nitrogen at different rates after termination. More research in this area will help producers determine the optimal time to pull the covers, as they say.
  • Prairie Populist tells us what we’ve all been thinking as the days warm up: all that snow we got this winter might turn out to be a flooding problem, and it definitely doesn’t guarantee rain later in the summer.
  • Western Confluence discusses how plants and animals are treated differently on the endangered species list
  • The lucky few who received a Smith River permit for this summer are being asked to help the state monitor algae through a recently launched free app
  • USDA is offering a full complement of special localized funding incentives for producers. They include drought resiliency targets in Southwest Montana, soil health in the Musselshell watershed, and forest fuel reduction in Broadwater, Lewis & Clark, and Meagher Counties.
  • And finally, our own Hayden Nelson (SGI Range Conservationist in Roundup) writes in about work she’s doing to address conifer encroachment in central Montana.

Ready for some conservation news on this fine *spring* day? Then read the this week’s edition of The Montana Conservationist: TMC 2018-03-20